PC

How To Buy A PC Case 2017

Buy A PC Case 2017

Buy A PC Case 2017

Buy A PC Case 2017

Buy a pc case: It does not matter if you treat your computer as the fulcrum of your office at home or just stuff under your desk, buying the right PC case issues.

At a minimum, you want to choose a PC case that is the right size for your needs and has space for all of your hardware and USB devices. But some PC cases offer much, much more. Spacious interior, lower temperatures, dull sound, extensive water cooling support, and fancy-schmancy tempered glass panels or RGB lighting are just the tips of the iceberg.

Here’s a guide to buying a PC Case.

Buy a PC Case: Size Matters

Before anything else, decide what size case you need. There are three broad dimensions of the case: Full Tower, Mid-Tower, and Mini-ITX.

Full-Tower and Mid-Tower cases are suitable for motherboards ATX standard-by far the most common motherboard size out there. Both can also accommodate smaller micro-ATX motherboards. Exact dimensioning varies from case to case, but most Mid-Towers perform up to about 18 inches tall and 8 or inches in width. Mid-Tower PCs are probably the most common form factor and have much space to fit systems with a closed loop CPU cooler, a couple of graphics cards, and a lot of storage.

Full-Tower cases are enormous. They often measure more than 20 inches in height and are longer and deeper than Mid-Tower cases, making them ideal if you are one of the rare people using a massive Extended-ATX motherboard. (ASUS’X399 motherboards for AMD Threadripper chips are EATX.)

Also consider a Full-Tower case if you are planning to charge your rig with large (or customized) cooling water, storage tanks, or 3-and 4-way graphics card configurations. Full-Tower cases often support more fans and 5.25-inch Drive bays as well. And the extra elbow room that is nice during the building.

Mini-ITX cases are the polar opposite of Full-Tower Case PC, built for diminutive Mini-ITX motherboards. Some of these can be wonderfully small and even fit inside Home Theater cabinets, but tight quarters can create compatibility problems with some hardware. Do not expect to use coolant or bighorn CPU Cooler in most cases mini-ITX. Some mini ITX cases do not support full-length graphics cards; confirm the maximum length before purchasing. Finally, there is not much room for extra hardware in these space-bound chassis so that it will be limited to pretty basic system configurations. They’re perfect for getting ready for LAN parts, anyway!

Sometimes you will see “Mini-Tower” cases, which slot mini-ITX and Mid-Tower sized to accommodate micro-ATX motherboards. They are rarer than others.

Buy a PC case: price considerations

Once you’ve decided how high a PC case you need, the next step is to figure out your budget.

If you’re spending $ 50 or less, you’re probably going to end up with a Bare-Bones, anonymous case with few extra features. These cases will cover the bases, but they do not offer much more. Try choosing one that has two fans, one in the front of the case, and one in the back, to maximize the airflow, which helps cool. You will not always find the option in this price range, however.

One of the best budget PC cases I have built in is Deepcool’s Tesseract ($ 52 on Amazon). This roomy Mid-Tower has decent elbow room, the duo above the fans case, and a lot of Drive bays-even if it does not fix extra-long graphics cards like the bestial ASUS Strix. This is solid for the price. We will talk more about recommendations at the end of the article.

Things open in the $ 50 to $ 150-former Price Range, which has seen a lot of progress over the last few years. You will find a lot of variances both in design and construction in the midrange. As always, be sure to check the steps to ensure your desired PC case can fit all your hardware, but you will also want to keep an eye on the extra features. They are much more common in this price range, especially when it comes to cost.

Features purely go down to personal preference or specifications that are needed for your generation. Some cases are built with more fans for higher performance; while others focus on design. Some, like Corsair Light 400C ($ 90 on Amazon) we used in PCWorld for all uses Ryzen 5 1600X build, even eliminate 5.25-inch D

Facebook Comments

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Most Popular

To Top
%d bloggers like this:
Read previous post:
How To Recover A Disabled Facebook Account
How To Recover A Disabled Facebook Account 2017

How To Recover A Disabled Facebook Account Do you want to recover your Facebook account disabled?, Then you are in...

Close