Android

Heart Scan: You Will Soon Be Able To Unlock Your Tech Devices With Your Heart

Heart-based biometric systems have been in use for almost a decade, mainly with electrodes that measure electrocardiogram signals. The new system has several advantages over current biometric tools

You Will Soon Be Able To Unlock Your Tech Devices With Your Heart

Heart-based biometric systems have been in use for almost a decade, mainly with electrodes that measure electrocardiogram signals. The new system has several advantages over current biometric tools

Although most of the known biometric security features currently available on smartphones and laptops are inconvenient, they are currently unavoidable. You must intervene, place your finger or touch a series of alphanumeric keys or slip into a pattern to overcome your security and enter your system. The new security system recently introduced by Samsung and Apple (though not new) is the facial recognition system that still needs you to look at your camera to log in.

To make things a little easier and less strenuous, some researchers have managed to unlock the PC by doing nothing but simply being in front of it. It does not use facial recognition, but it uses the size of the human heart to detect its presence.

Researchers at the University of Buffalo have discovered a new, non-contact, remote biometric tool that could be the next breakthrough in computer security. The computer has developed a computer security system using the dimensions of its heart as its identifier. The system uses a low-level Doppler radar to measure the heart and then continues to monitor your heart to make sure no one else has stepped in to run your computer.

How It Works

The system is a safe and more efficient alternative to passwords and other biometric identifiers, researchers say. It can be used eventually for smartphones and at the airport screen barricades. The intensity of the radar signal of the system is much lower than that of Wi-Fi and therefore poses no threat to the health. The reader is about five milliwatts, which is less than 1 percent of the radiation from the usual smartphones, and it takes about 8 seconds to scan a heart for the first time. After that, the monitor can continue to recognize that heart continually. The system, which was three years in manufacturing, uses the geometry of the heart. The size and shape, and how it moves, is used to make an identification.

“Two people have never been found with identical hearts, and people’s hearts do not change shape unless they suffer from severe heart disease,” says his research.

Heart-based biometric systems have been in use for almost a decade, mainly with electrodes that measure electrocardiogram signals. The new system has several advantages over current biometric tools, such as fingerprints and retina (eye) scans. It is a passive, non-contact device, so users do not bother to authenticate when they connect. And secondly, it continually monitors users. In short, the computer will not work if there is another person in front of it, which makes it easier for individuals who do not have to remember to close the session when they are away from their PCS.

The investigator plans to miniaturize the system and have it installed on the corners of computer keyboards, and it could also be used for user identification on cell phones. At airports, a similar device could monitor a person 30 meters away.

The technology is described in a document that inventors will present at the 23rd Annual International Conference on Mobile Computing and Communication (MOBICOM) in Utah.

Facebook Comments

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Most Popular

To Top
%d bloggers like this:
Read previous post:
Transfer Data From Your Android To iPhone
How To Transfer Data From Your Android Device To iPhone 2017

Transfer Data From Your Android To iPhone   Transferring files from iOS to Android has not yet become an easy...

Close